Take the heat out of those hotspots!

One of the most common issues seen at our practice during these hot months involves skin infections, rashes, and allergies.
One problem, in particular, is extremely painful and uncomfortable for our pet friends; hotspots. A hotspot is an area of acute moist dermatitis with an infection in the skin that often has a purulent discharge, swelling, and redness. This is usually a very painful issue.
These hotspots are progressive and will continue to enlarge if not tended to. They might not be obvious to see because they hide under the fur. Therefore, one of the first things that the pet owner must do is to clip the hairs surrounding the affected area because the hair acts as a scaffold to hold in the pus and bacteria. Once clipped the affected area is usually 2-3 times larger than expected. We get calls of frantic owners swearing that it all started as a mosquito bite-size and now it’s covering half their neck or a large portion of their pet’s body. We believe them because hotspots are a type of allergic response and it does proliferate quickly. Some patients can become extremely ill with a fever, anorexia and start behaving strangely including becoming a bit aggressive. The veterinary treatment aims at stopping the allergic reaction and treating the skin infection while providing pain relief. at our practice we use a multi-modal integrative approach to treatment and include eastern and western approaches. We use antibiotics for a brief 7-10 days. We also use pharmaceuticals to control pain sensations in the brain like Buprenorphine, gabapentin, or tramadol. Shampoo therapy might be used to provide soothing relief to the whole skin and prevent other spots from developing. The injectable drug Cytopoint is often added to block the receptors of itch in the brain and thus stopping the pet from self-mutilating while scratching themselves. The herbal formula Wind toxin is a great herb to stop the itch, nourish the skin, and relieving the allergic response by clearing the heat.
One big consideration we take into account is the location of the hot spot. The skin of your pet is divided into dermatomes, which are areas of the skin that have innervation by a spinal nerve. What does that mean? if your pet has a recurrent hotspot or skin lesion in a particular spot of the legs or body, it could be a manifestation of an impaired nerve in his/her spine! A bad intervertebral disk could be a cause, or maybe damage to the nerve branch. Regardless, when we see a hotspot, we can do motion palpation of the spine to check for any pain or misalignment, then perform an adjustment ( like a chiropractor would do) to correct it. Once the nerve is free and fully functioning the hot spot could heal and stop recurring. remember, this condition is painful but can be easily treated by your veterinarian. Do not let the allergens and humidity of the season get the best of your furry companions,

My journey as a TCVM teacher

Over the last years I’ve been extremely proud to be part of twhe teaching family at the Chi institutes in Fl and Costa Rica. I have been able to influence hundreds of students through my instruction of basic and advanced acupuncture as well as my lectures. I recently was asked to be a test instructor and I realized I was heavily invested in the outcome of my students tests. It felt as if with each one of them that passed the practical test it validated the time and effort I dedicated in the teaching of those points. I got to say that although being a teacher was not something I thought I could do, I discovered that it’s something I really enjoy doing!

https://www.facebook.com/mitsie.vargas/posts/10214184580141848